Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Tuesday, May 19, 2015 12:30 am by M. in , ,    No comments
To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters120 minutes
Writer and Director: Sally Wainwright
Executive Producer: Faith Penhale, Head of BBC Drama Wales
Producer: Karen Lewis
BBC News gives details about their Brontë biopic film project:
A drama about the "tragedy and passion" of the difficult lives of the Brontë family is to appear on BBC One, written and directed by Last Tango In Halifax author Sally Wainwright.
It will explore the relationships between Charlotte, Emily and Anne and their brother Branwell, who was latterly an alcoholic and drug addict.
All three sisters managed to produce great literary works before their untimely deaths.
Wainwright said she was "thrilled".
The Bafta-winning writer, whose other credits include TV series Happy Valley, described the sisters as "fascinating, talented, ingenious Yorkshire women". (...)
To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters will be filmed in and around Yorkshire, where they lived. (...)
BBC One controller Charlotte Moore said: "It's an extraordinary tale of family tragedy and their passion and determination, against the odds, to have their genius recognised in a male 19th-Century world."
The programme will also explore how their self-educated father, who grew up in poor, rural Ireland, encouraged his children to become passionate about literature.
Casting has yet to be announced.
The Guardian and The Telegraph add:
The one-off, two-hour drama will follow Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë’s relationship with each other and their brother Branwell, who in the last three years of his life was plagued by alcoholism and drug addiction. (...)
BBC1 controller Charlotte Moore said: “The Brontë sisters have always been enigmatic but Sally Wainwright’s brilliantly authentic new BBC1 drama brings the women behind some of our greatest literary masterpieces to life.
“It’s an extraordinary tale of family tragedy and their passion and determination, against the odds, to have their genius recognised in a male 19th century world.” (...)
The drama explores the siblings’ relationship with each other and their self-educated father, who grew up in an impoverished home in rural Ireland and encouraged his children – irrespective of their gender – to become passionate about literature.
It also portrays their “increasingly difficult relationship with their brother Branwell, who in the last three years of his life – following a tragically misguided love affair – sank into alcoholism, drug addiction and appalling behaviour”.
Also in Entertainment Weekly, Belfast Telegraph, Prolific North, Daily Express, Broadcast, Radio Times...

Ann Dinsdale talks about the project and the Brontë Parsonage Museum's involvement in Radio Leeds Martin Kelner's programme (around 1 h 38 minutes into the programme).

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