Monday, January 12, 2015

The Guardian and many others mourn the death of film producer Samuel Goldwyn Jr and quote him on his father's modus operandi.
In 1986, Goldwyn told the Los Angeles Times his goal was to appeal to sophisticated movie lovers.
“I was brought up in a tradition of patience,” Goldwyn said. “My father never made films that were instantaneous hits. Wuthering Heights was not a success the first time around. Neither was Best Years of Our Lives. They had to be nursed .... Basically, he was always waiting.”
Also in The Guardian, Peter Kosminsky speaks about his own take on Wuthering Heights. He says what many people think too:
He usually generates his own projects but had enjoyed Mantel’s study of the rise of Henry VIII’s consigliere Thomas Cromwell. “I love Hilary as a writer, I love her iconoclasm. She’s a true rebel and I admire her for it.” This was enough to trump what he calls “a bit of a confidence crisis about period drama” previously, as a result of having directed “a truly terrible adaptation of Wuthering Heights” in the 1990s – “It was pretty much the first film I made and I was totally out of my depth.” (Tara Conlan)
Hats off to him for speaking so openly about it.

Ruth Wilson has won a Golden Globe for his role in The Affair. She has an anecdote about her previous nomination for her role as Jane Eyre, as reported by Deadline.
Ruth Wilson’s win completes the dominance of freshmen shows tonight with her win for Showtime’s The Affair. She has a funny anecdote of her first Golden Globe nomination for Jane Eyre the year the Globes ceremony was cancelled because of the writers strike, with her watching the stripped-down winners announcement from the hotel bar. She lost then but won tonight for playing “a complex, should I say depressed character” on The Affair. Best line tonight to a co-star, addressed at Dominic West: “Dom, your ass is a thing of great beauty, don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.” (Nellie Andreeva)
Dallas News reviews the play The Book Club Play in which
Tiana Kaye Johnson and Sarah Rutan offer intricately realized portraits of rumbling rebellion. They explode with perfect timing not long after Ana’s nemesis, Alex, played with charismatic verve by Brandon Potter, arrives, pushing to explore Twilight — to Ana’s horror —and the similarities between Edward Cullen and Emily Brontë’s Heathcliff. (Nancy Churnin)
Entertainment Weekly's The Community has a recap of episode 2 of season 1 of Dawson's Creek:
At school, Pacey and Miss Jacobs are dealing with the aftermath of their kiss. Pacey struts around like the cat that got the canary, while she is understandably shaken. Lecturing on Wuthering Heights, she says, “Catherine was essentially a mess; Heathcliff was basically a decent guy who had a lot to learn about life.” I THINK there’s a double meaning in that. (Head Over Feels)
Glasgow Evening Times speaks to writer Maggie Ritchie:
 A title she always goes back to is Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea, a prequel to Jane Eyre, which tells the story of Rochester's mad wife in the attic.
"It's another 19th century woman driven mad," says Maggie. "It is so evocative of the smells and colours of the Caribbean where she grew up and conjured up memories of my childhood in Africa and in Venezuela, and inspired me to write my second novel." (Angela McManus)
Picture Us Reading reviews favourably Jane F***ing Eyre by J.K. Really; Pages Unbound reviews The Professor.

4 comments:

  1. Wuthering Heights by Peter Kosminsky is my favorite movie adaptation, it is not perfect but far away from calling it terrible. Thanks to this movie I discovered this great novel such an impression it made on me. It captured the spirit of the novel and the tragic characters, with impressive music. It is very said its own director calls it terrible, and feels need to apologize for that over and over, because of what "many people think."

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  2. Wuthering Heights was not a success the first time around. Neither was Best Years of Our Lives. They had to be nursed

    Best Years of Our Lives won the Oscar for best picture of the year...I think that means it was success from the get go

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  3. The reply function went away after I posted or I would reply to Anonymous directly.

    I could not agree more. ...the film is indeed true to the novel. People call it "depressing " ... well hello, Heathcliff and Cathy are not likable people nor is it an easy book . Juliette Binoche and Ralph Fiennes were perfectly cast and give such performances that the film's imperfections are put in the shade imo

    It is very said its own director calls it terrible, and feels need to apologize for that over and over, because of what "many people think."

    Indeed .

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  4. Apart from Juliette Binoche playing both Cathy I and Cathy II, I thought Kosminsky's adaptation was quite good. It wasn't perfect, but a lot better than the ones with Laurence Olivier and Timothy Dalton.

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