Thursday, July 02, 2020

Good news from the Brontë Parsonage on Twitter:
4 Bars Rest features a picture of cornet player Bethan Plant playing outside the Brontë Parsonage.
Bronte
Source
Bethan Plant, who has just finished her degree studies at the RNCM in Manchester, and is a member of Brighouse & Rastrick Band, is pictured outside the Parsonage in Howarth [sic] in West Yorkshire, home to the famous literary Bronte family. [...]
Bethan was pictured by Lorne Campbell playing 'Cathy's Theme', the famous melody from the 1939 film adaptation of 'Wuthering Heights' starring Laurence Olivier as Heathcliffe [sic], and which was composed by Academy award winner Alfred Newman.
The images were sent to all leading national newspapers.
In 2007 Philip Wilby composed his critically acclaimed 'Brontë Mass' which was later transcribed for brass band.
It is hoped that the museum will open in the near future.
Still locally, Evening Standard recommends staying at Ponden Hall as it is one of the 'coolest and quirkiest English B&Bs'.
Ponden Hall Bed & Breakfast, North Yorkshire
On the edge of a moor loved by the Brontë sisters, Ponden Hall is even said to be the inspiration for Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights. The main hall was built in 1634 and the library was often used by Emily in the 1800’s. Now a three-bedroom B&B overlooking the Ponden Reservoir, bibliophiles should opt for The Earnshaw room, complete with a cosy box bed built to the specifications of the bed Mr Lockwood slept in at Wuthering Heights. Breakfast is the busiest time of day, and will be one of your favourite takeaways from your visit at Ponden - opt for the full Yorkshire breakfast for a northern twist on the classic. With thick cut bacon, luxury sausages and black pudding (a vegetarian option is available too), it's hearty enough to set you up for a day exploring the moors. (Laura Hampson)
According to The Guardian, Jane Eyre is one of the 'Top 10 best-dressed characters in fiction'.
2. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Jane is so fiercely attached to her Puritan dress that even when about to marry the rich Mr Rochester she rejects bright colours for “sober black satin and pearl grey silk”. Paradoxically, this makes her passionate originality flame brighter to him – and us – an original touch that makes this poor, plain, intelligent and brave young woman eternally beloved by readers. When happily reunited with Mr Rochester, we learn through him that her dress is blue – the colour of heaven and happiness. (Amanda Craig)
Times of India lists Emily Brontë as one of several 'Best selling novelists who wrote just one book'.
02/9 ​Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
The Brontë family produced quite a few famous authors in one generation. Sisters Emily, Charlotte and Anne were all published novelists who are read til this day. While her sisters both published more than one book, Emily only managed to get one published in her lifetime. She might have been writing, or at least plotting, a second one but she died young, of disease.
Her book 'Wuthering Heights' is a tale of love which was so passionate and violent that critics of that time (the early 1800s) thought it was written by a man.
Lancashire Post reviews Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.
Moreno-Garcia’s enthralling novel gives a brief nod to classics like Jane Eyre and Rebecca but features a much more strident and forceful leading lady… flirty, feisty Noemí is no shrinking violet but a rebellious young woman intent on unearthing the truth of the dastardly Doyles. (Pam Norfolk)
The Darien Times asks teachers and students to weigh in the racial diversity debate.
One student said the school doesn’t assign a lot of books or articles that are written from Black peoples’ perspectives, telling their experience.
Another student said within the high school curriculum, there is a lot of focus a lot on classics like Jane Eyre, Black Beauty or Lord of the Flies, “but I think that we could incorporate more literature written by the black community. That would give us a different perspective on the world. We should read literary criticism from different lenses.” (Sandra Diamond Fox)
The Yorkshire Press announces what to expect from this year's edition of the Yorkshire Festival of Story in August.
Yorkshire’s rich heritage will be celebrated as the Brontë Society explores the fierce brilliance of Anne Brontë in her bicentenary year. (Alexis Wilson-Barrett)
The Sisters' Room has a post on Louisa May Alcott and Charlotte Brontë. El País (Spain) mentions TB in connection to La Traviata and mentions, in passing, how it affected the Brontë family. El espectador (Colombia) discusses pseudonyms. L'Opinione delle Libertà (Italy) has an article on Wuthering Heights.

Finally, on The Brussels Brontë Blog, Helen MacEwan writes about the Koekelberg sqaure to be named after the Brontë sisters. HLN (Belgium) has an article about it too.

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