Saturday, November 02, 2019

Saturday, November 02, 2019 10:57 am by Cristina in , , ,    No comments
A couple of Irish newspapers are looking forward to seeing The Unthanks play live from their Emily Brontë repertoire.
Sunday 3rd
The Unthanks
National Concert Hall, 8pm, €25 nch.ie
Rachel and Becky Unthank invite us into the darkly passionate world of Emily Bronte with a song cycle bearing all the quiet beauty that has become a hallmark of their sound. This live performance of The Emily Bronte Song Cycle will also feature songs from their previous albums that make up the Lines series, promising an atmospheric evening, and at its heart, a unique collaboration between a literary great and one of the most innovative folk ensembles working today. (Siobhan Long in The Irish Times)
The Unthanks: The Emily Brontë Song Cycle
National Concert Hall, Dublin
North of England’s The Unthanks continue to mark our cards with yet another smartly themed sequence of songs. Commissioned by the Brontë Society over a year ago to celebrate Emily Brontë’s 200th birthday (she was born July 30th, 1818), songwriter Adrian McNally was tasked with turning 10 of her poems into songs. Utilising the group’s already acclaimed style of oral history folk music, McNally and sisters Rachel and Becky Unthank delivered the album, Shall Earth No More Inspire Thee. Expect an evocative evening of Brontë’s work interspersed with other back catalogue songs. (Tony Clayton-Lea in The Irish Times too)
The Unthanks invite us into the darkly passionate world of Emily Brontë, with a song cycle bearing all the quiet beauty they are known and loved for. Commissioned to mark Brontë’s 200th birthday, and using her original cabinet piano to write on, Yorkshire born Unthanks composer Adrian McNally has turned ten of her poems into song, performed with bandmates Rachel and Becky Unthank and recorded in the Parsonage in Haworth where Emily lived and worked. Captured and released as Part 3 of Lines - a trilogy of records inspired by female writers across time - this live performance of The Emily Brontë Song Cycle will also feature songs from the other records that make up Lines, promising an atmospheric evening, and at its heart, a unique collaboration between a literary great and one of the most innovative and critically acclaimed bands working today. (The Journal of Music)
Spear's has a roundabout way of recommending Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago.
Autumn is the perfect time to turn up the heating and spend evenings revisiting old classics. While something from Dickens or a Brontë sister are might be popular choices, Boris Pasternak’s Dr. Zhivago is on our reading list for November, as the Folio Society is releasing a beautiful limited edition with a new translation by the author’s descendent, Nicolas Pasternak Slater. (Emelia Hamilton Russell)
Pajiba reviews the film The Nightingale.
The Nightingale is set in the Australian island of Tasmania in 1825, which back then was called Van Diemen’s Land. Where we start on the island, in the south, looks straight out of Wuthering Heights, with thick mist and fog, lush green forests, and ferns and moss. (Roxana Hadadi)

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