Saturday, April 13, 2019

Publishers Weekly reports a new and upcoming Brontë-related novel:
PW is first to report that, five days after receiving the manuscript, Atria’s Daniella Wexler preempted a debut historical novel, Brontë’s Mistress by Finola Austin, based on the true, heretofore untold story of Lydia Robinson and her affair with Branwell Brontë. According to the publisher, “the novel gives voice to the courageous, flawed, complex woman slandered in Elizabeth Gaskell’s The Life of Charlotte Brontë as the ‘wicked’ elder seductress who corrupted the young Brontë brother, driving him to an early grave and bringing on the downfall of the entire Brontë family.” Danielle Egan-Miller at Browne & Miller negotiated the deal for world English and audio rights. (Liz Hartman)
Keighley News reports Easter activities at the Parsonage: 
We're really enjoying the spring sunshine at the moment, as are some early Easter visitors to the museum.
Some schools have already broken up for the Easter holidays, and as such the museum is bustling with visitors.
We’ve got free talks and walks through the holiday period so visitors can enjoy 20-minute talks at 2pm every day, on a range of subjects, depending on the specialist interest of our wonderful and knowledgeable museum assistants and volunteers.
You might get to hear about life and death in Haworth, learn about the Bronte servants, or the early years of the Brontë siblings. Each talk is unique!
On Wednesday April 24 instead of the talks we will be leading a guided walk up onto Penistone Hill (weather permitting!) to get a sense of the landscape which was so inspirational to the Bronte family.
And also on holiday Wednesdays we have our popular Wild Wednesday drop-in workshops. In the first workshop you’ll be able to make Easter bunny cards, and the second workshop continues the Easter theme with the opportunity to make beautiful Paper Easter Eggs – much healthier than chocolate ones!
All these activities are free with admission to the museum.
Spring also brings the return of our Late Night Thursdays, where you get to experience the museum after hours. These late nights occur on the third Thursday of every month, so our first this year is April 18 – just a few days before Charlotte Brontë’s 203rd birthday!
Visiting the Parsonage that evening will be characters who knew Charlotte well – Tabby, the Brontës’ faithful and long-serving housekeeper, and John Brown, the sexton and Branwell’s drinking partner – and they’ll be sharing their knowledge about life in the Parsonage with Charlotte and her sisters.
After 5.30pm admission is free to visitors who live in the BD22, BD21, and BD20 postcode areas and Thornton, birthplace of the Brontës. Last admission is 7pm.
Spring is also a fantastic time to experience our new audio experience, which features the poems of Emily Brontë set to music by The Unthanks.
The experience is free with admission to the museum – you simply pick up the audio equipment from the shop desk, where you’ll be given an easy-to-follow map, and then you head out in Emily’s footsteps up to Penistone Hill. You can book ahead via the website if you want to guarantee a particular time.
The reviews have been overwhelming positive, with plenty of visitors tweeting lovely comments, whilst The Guardian reviewer described it as ‘quite incredible’. High praise indeed!
And finally, we were all very excited last week when Frank Cottrell Boyce paid us a visit to discuss plans for the work he’ll be doing with us in the second half of the year. (Diane Fare)
The Guardian reviews the reality show Just One Night: The human heart has hidden treasures
In secret kept, in silence sealed;
The thoughts, the hopes, the dreams, the pleasures,
Whose charms were broken if revealed.
Charlotte Brontë, Evening Solace

Blond, good set of boobs, blue eyes, good figure, good personality.
Stevie, 23, Just One Night (BBC Three)

Some human hearts are simpler than others. And a good thing too: living in a world full of Brontës would be exhausting. (Lucy Mangan)
It's undoubtedly a tough genre to get right. Todd uses two literate protagonists, the mostly chaste Tessa (Josephine Langford) and the brooding, tattooed Hardin (Hero Fiennes Tiffin), as stand-ins for the uneasy lovers of classic literature found in such novels as "Wuthering Heights," "Jane Eyre" and "The Great Gatsby."
The Irish Times and grand Irish homes:
Tarbert House in Kerry has been in the Leslie family since 1690. Ursula Leslie, a founder of the America-Ireland fund that she says “has put a lot of money into Ireland,” returned here with her late husband John in 1970. A retired barrister, she used the tax relief to help put the ancestral roof in order as well as repairing 13 of the house’s many windows – through which in 1854 the newly-married Charlotte Brontë must have gazed over the wooded parkland. (Mary Leland)
The Daily Mail publishes a story of how Julian Assange hid on Kathy Lette's attic before seeking asylum in Ecuador's embassy:
She described her frustration with his refusal to read women's literature, adding: 'When he was in Wandsworth prison I sent him in a big box of books by Jane Austen, the Brontë's, all my favourite female authors and said "now that you're a captive audienceread these books." (Joe Middleton & Ross Ibbetson)
A passing Brontë reference in the Financial Times
I known as the Mistral roars down the village's narrow streets; it made me feel as if she and I were two characters in a Brontë novel with a Mediterranean setting. (...)
It was the time of year when the fierce wind known as the Mistral roars down the village's narrow streets; it made me feel as if she and I were two characters in a Brontë novel with a Mediterranean setting.
More After (the film) reviews:
Pero al igual que la historia no acaba de convencernos, tenemos que remarcar que en varias escenas de la película, los protagonistas citan y conversan sobre las novelas ‘Cumbres borrascosas
It's undoubtedly a tough genre to get right. Todd uses two literate protagonists, the mostly chaste Tessa (Josephine Langford) and the brooding, tattooed Hardin (Hero Fiennes Tiffin), as stand-ins for the uneasy lovers of classic literature found in such novels as "Wuthering Heights," "Jane Eyre" and "The Great Gatsby."’, de Emily Brontë, y ‘Orgullo y prejuicio’, de Jane Austen. Dos clásicos de la literatura que por el guión podemos entender que fueron modelos para la historia de amor entre Hardin y Tessa Y es cierto que no solemos tener diálogos de este tipo, en este estilo de películas. (Clara Herrador on HappyFM) (Kurt Russell) (Translation)
It's undoubtedly a tough genre to get right. Todd uses two literate protagonists, the mostly chaste Tessa (Josephine Langford) and the brooding, tattooed Hardin (Hero Fiennes Tiffin), as stand-ins for the uneasy lovers of classic literature found in such novels as "Wuthering Heights," "Jane Eyre" and "The Great Gatsby." (Caroline Seadman, Catholic News Service).
Inspired by “punk edits” of Styles on the internet (fan edits where celebrities are photoshopped and covered with tattoos and piercings), Todd wrote a fanfiction where Styles wasn’t in a boy band but was a college bad boy who seduces—and eventually falls in love with—Tessa, an innocent freshman who lives in his dorm. She called the story After. “It was more along the lines of a modern-day Pride and Prejudice and Wuthering Heights than anything to do with the actual Harry Styles,” she says. (Jason Pham in StyleCaster)
Not that he's your typical bad boy, though, since he seems to have very literary tastes. Spotting a book on Tessa's shelf, he comments, "The Great Gatsby, that's a good book." He's also able to quote from Wuthering Heights and engage in a spirited classroom argument with Tessa, about Pride and Prejudice, in which the subtext is inescapable. (Frank Scheck in The Hollywood Reporter)
After,” which wasn’t screened in advance for critics, also falls into that desperately referential category of love story that name-checks Austen and the Brontes as if that automatically places itself in the same lineage of swoon-worthy classics. (Robert Abele in The Wrap)
Dessuten er han selvoppnevnt ekspert på trøblete romanhelter i britisk litteratur; Mr. Darcy fra «Stolthet og fordom» (Jane Austen) og Heathcliff fra «Stormfulle høyder» (Emily Brontë) og dessuten er han alltid iført en Ramones-T-sjorte. På spørsmål om hvem han elsker høyest i verden svarer han selvsagt «meg selv». En sånn fyr må man jo bare falle for. I bøker. Og på film. (Inger Betzrud in Dagbladet) (Translation)
Il tutto citando principalmente due libri: Cime tempestose (Ah, quanto ci manca il simpatico, vecchio Heathcliff!) e Orgoglio e pregiudizio. Emily Brontë e Jane Austen. Attrazione per l’eccesso e salutare equilibrio. Senza mai scegliere fino in fondo… (Rosa Baldocci in Amica) (Translation)
More mentions in Wipy.tv (in Spanish), El Palomitrón (Spanish), Clarín (Argentina), Vigevano24 (Italy), Everyeye (Italy), Glamour (Germany) ...

BookRiot lists some 'must-read' literary biographies:
The Brontë Myth by Lucasta Miller
Okay, I’d rather read about the Wollstonecrafts/Shelleys, or the Peabodys, because I think the Brontës are a bit overrated…but like the Plath biography, which was a biography of her biographies, this book tries to demystify the myth that surrounds the Brontës. (Sarah Ullery)
Cherwell reviews Madeline Miller's Circe :
The narrative thrust of the novel is essentially that of a Bildungsroman, and within that tradition Circe seems a Grecian equivalent of Jane Eyre. (Jenny Scoones)
L'Est Republicain (France) reports how the upcoming rehearsals for the Bernard Herrmann opera Wuthering Heights in Nancy will be open and free.  The Telegraph & Argus explains how the cameras installed on the Black Bull have been reported. Tea Time Ruminations posts about Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre's Library shows a Russian translation of the novel. Vijesti (Montenegro) reviews the performances of Wuthering Heights in Cetinje.

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