Sunday, September 20, 2015

Sunday, September 20, 2015 4:49 pm by M. in , , , , ,    No comments
Some more reviews of the National Theatre Jane Eyre adaptation directed by Sally Cookson. In A Younger Theatre:
This devised play takes risks, most notably in the music. The folky accompaniment of the band works well, particularly in transitions between time and place, but it’s in the songs that the biggest surprises come, with ‘Mad About The Boy’ and ‘Crazy’ (Gnarls Berkley) the biggest gambles. Both pay off however, as the songs seem to take on a timeless quality and are delivered in the gorgeous vocals of Melanie Marshall – she also plays Bertha, and it’s perhaps a tad obvious, but her constant hovering presence throughout Jane’s adulthood is unnervingly effective.
Overall, this production is intelligent and captivating, with flashes of both witty humour and high drama that almost entirely dispelled my reservations about this page-to-stage adaptation. Certain striking images remain in fixed in your mind – the streaming veil, the poor schoolgirls’ dresses and Jane bursting open the window for a taste of freedom all spring to mind – but these powerful visuals are also backed by consistently strong performances. This is a wonderful opportunity for London audiences to encounter a taste of fantastic regional work – well worth a watch. (Laura Peatman)
The review of Culture Whisper is also very positive:
The direction has some brilliant little twists. The recurring motif of Jane-as-caged-bird comes to a head when she arrives at Thornfield, where two members of the come behind her and flap her dress. The music soars - she is free - and the effect is beautiful. Jane's long, uncomfortable journeys by coach are inventively, hilariously captured by the entire cast running on the spot, side-by-side, panting and exhausted. Perhaps the most beloved of all the characters was Richard Hurst's Pilot the dog. More canine than human, his performance was a tour de force, complete with a wagging riding-crop tail, (...)
One more quibble: the half-hearted and promptly aborted inclusion of the inheritance subplot, where Jane discovers a rich relative and her own small fortune. This is alluded to, and then dropped. Why include any mention of it at all?
Nevertheless, this production was one of the most engaging things we'd seen on stage since Norris' tenure began. Beg, borrow or steal a ticket.
Books & Review lists books showcasing magical realism. We are not really sure if Wuthering Heights is exactly that:
Today, "Wuthering Heights" is considered a masterpiece of English classics and one of the most complex and demonic love stories in literature.
It revolves around the intense and passionate love between Catherine and Heathcliff. The story mentioned impossible storms and the appearances of ghosts.
Ángeles Caso continues her Spanish media tour promoting Todo ese fuego. Now in El Norte de Castilla:
«Creo que supieron mucho más del amor y del deseo que lo que nos han contado», dice Ángeles Caso, quien en su última novela, "Todo ese fuego" (Planeta), recrea la vida de las tres escritoras.
Caso lamenta que los hombres no lean a las hermanas Brontë ni en general a muchas escritoras. «No hace mucho tiempo Antonio Muñoz Molina confesó en un artículos que había tenido que cumplir los 50 años para decidirse a leer a Virginia Woolf y descubrir su grandeza. Tengo amigos que me han reconocido que no leen a mujeres», dice con pesar la narradora. (...)
«Creo que supieron mucho más del amor y del deseo que lo que nos han contado», dice Ángeles Caso, quien en su última novela, "Todo ese fuego" (Planeta), recrea la vida de las tres escritoras.
Caso lamenta que los hombres no lean a las hermanas Brontë ni en general a muchas escritoras. «No hace mucho tiempo Antonio Muñoz Molina confesó en un artículos que había tenido que cumplir los 50 años para decidirse a leer a Virginia Woolf y descubrir su grandeza. Tengo amigos que me han reconocido que no leen a mujeres», dice con pesar la narradora. (Antonio Paniagua) (Translation)
The Belleville News-Democrat Answer Man's piece of trivia is devoted to the Brontës:
Anyone familiar with English literature likely has heard of the Brontë sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne. But who was their only brother — and how was he named?
Anyone who has taken a high school literature class likely has heard of the Brontë sisters — Charlotte, Emily and Anne. In the early 19th century, the English trio turned out a series of novels that have turned into classics, including “Wuthering Heights,” “Jane Eyre” and “The Tenant of Wildfall Hall.” However, like many women writers at the time, they used male pseudonyms early in their career, because they feared readers would not take women writers seriously. They became the Bell triplets — Currier, Ellis and Acton. But you may not have learned that there really was one son among the six Brontë children, and he, too, was a writer as well as a painter. He was named Branwell after his mother’s maiden name. Although he showed some promise, he died at age 31 of tuberculosis, likely aggravated by alcoholism and addiction to opium and laudanum. However, in Elizabeth Gaskel’s “The Life of Charlotte Brontë,” an eyewitness said that to show the power of the human will, Branwell insisted on dying while standing up “and when the last agony began, he insisted on assuming the position just mentioned.” (Roger Schlueter)
El País's Cinemanía (Spain) mentions the latest Terence Davies film Sunset Song:
Sunset Song, de un director muy querido en San Sebastián. Terence Davies ya estuvo en Sección Oficial en 2011 concursando con la delicada The Deep Blue Sea y ahora vuelve, vía Toronto, para contarnos la novelesca vida -pasan más cosas que en Cumbres borrascosas- de Chris Guthrie, la protagonista de la novela de Lewis Grassic Gibbon que adapta Sunset Song. (Andrea G. Bermejo) (Translation)
LanguageHat is reading Jane Eyre and posts about some interesting linguistic and style items;  a Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights reference in a Tanya Gold interview to Sue Perkins in The Sunday Times Magazine; the ace black blog reviews Jane Eyre 1944; Vesna Armstrong Photography posts several nice pictures of Top Withins and surroundings; Bookriot analyzes and compares several versions of the Red Room scene in Jane Eyre.

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