Wednesday, March 25, 2015

The Huddersfield Daily Examiner reports that a first edition of Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is going under the hammer today at Bonham's as part of The Library of the late Hugh Selbourne, MD.
A rare first edition copy of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by former Mirfield governess, Anne Bronte is set to fetch around £7,000 when it comes up for auction.
The book, originally published in three volumes in June 1848 under Anne Bronte’s pseudonym Acton Bell, is expected to sell for between £6,000 and £8,000 at Bonhams in London on Wednesday.
It is part of a £1m library lovingly assembled over a lifetime by the late Hugh Selbourne, a Manchester physician. (Neil Atkinson)
EDIT: Sold for £9,375 (€12,729) inc. premium.

The Houston Chronicle highlights the Brontëite in writer Kazuo Ishiguro.
Although born in Japan, and influenced by samurai culture in interesting ways, Ishiguro has lived in England since 1960, when he was five, and comes across as thoroughly English. Even before he spoke English, he enjoyed Westerns on television, and later, was hugely influenced by the novels of Charlotte Brontë, particularly Jane Eyre and Villette. (Doni M. Wilson)
Playbill has a 'Cue & A' with musical theatre actress Ciara Renée:
Last book you read: Jane Eyre.” I've got like 5 other books I've just started or I'm half-way through. (Matthew Blank)
Bustle recommends 'The 14 Best Books To Read On Spring Break' and one of them is
Wildalone by Krassi Zourkova
In a statement juxtaposing some of the most different works of literature in existence, Wildalone has been called a “bewitching blend of Twilight, The Secret History, Jane Eyre, and A Discovery of Witches.” Which is to say there is romance, mystery, and of course some magic, along with both Greek and Bulgarian mythology all wrapped up in this novel. Thea Slavin traveled from Eastern Europe to attend college at Princeton, and once there she falls into a love triangle with two brothers and discovers a family secret. (Caitlin White)
IndieWire looks at '7 Clips That Define 'Mad Men,' And What the Cast Has to Say About Them'.
What happens in the clip: Considered three seasons in the making, Betty finally confronts Don about his deeply-buried secrets -- all while his mistress, Suzanne Farrell (Abigail Spencer), is waiting outside for him. It's a tense, revelatory scene that marks the end of the Draper marriage and the first of many wake-up calls for Don. [...]
Weiner, meanwhile, explained how the scene exemplifies the series' core concern with class: [...]
Why did he want to be Don Draper? Because he got to put on that suit of armor. Why did she marry a man that she knew nothing about? Because he was that guy. Here, you strip it all away and you're from rural poverty. You're beneath me. You will never marry me and get into my class. Her aspirations are that, she feels incredibly duped. It's like 'Wuthering Heights' to me. We don’t have a lot of this in America, or we deny it. January knew right away that Betty was a snob, and that she was aspirational and a daddy’s girl, a little bit of a brat, and had been valued for her beauty. She brings that to it. (David Canfield)
PBS Newshour has an article on tuberculosis and defines it as
 the disease that carried away the poet John Keats and the scribbling Brontë sisters. (Dr Howard Markel)
Well, probably not Charlotte.

Take a look at March in the Brontë Parsonage garden on the Brontë Society website. And look at local artist Kate Lycett's view of the Parsonage on the Society's Facebook page. Jo ReadsBooks reviews Jane Eyre.


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