Thursday, March 26, 2015

Thursday, March 26, 2015 7:57 am by Cristina in , , , , ,    No comments
AnOther interviews fashion designer Véronique Branquinho and asks her about her Emily Brontë sweaters.
Veronique Branquinho's long-standing career has often flown under the radar of mainstream fashion press, leaving the Belgian designer with an aura of mystery that was elegantly mirrored in her A/W15 collection. Emily Brontë's poetry was subtly incorporated into knitted sweaters while leather was paired with tweeds for a modern romanticism expressing "the power of a whisper," the epithet that has come to define her woman. [...]
On Emily Brontë…
"The A/W15 invitation was a poem by Emily Brontë… in fact, all of the poetry in the collection was. I took it from a really beautiful book I have called Poems of Solitude. I think that is part of my women; they’re independent and strong, but at the same time they’re fragile and I can imagine they get lost in romantic fantasies of solitude. I think that the hair and makeup was the most dark-romantic part, very Emily Brontë. It’s a little bit like an image of a haunted woman in the forest, running away from something. I can imagine that the hair gets loose like that, tree branches getting the hair and making it messy; they were like little birds escaping and dreaming away." (Olivia Singer)
Buzzfeed shares the lessons its community members have learned from books.
4. From Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë:
“Don’t be scared because you don’t have all the answers right away. You will learn through your experiences and find your own way to happiness. Don’t rely on others to tell you how to be happy or what makes a good life. It’s up to you to follow your heart and find happiness from there.”
Suggested by Caitlin R., via Facebook [...]
22. From Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë:
“Listen to your conscience and do the right thing, no matter the cost. You can’t put a price on self-respect. Follow your heart. Things may not always work out the way you’d like, but if you live according to your principles, they will work out.”
Suggested by Lynn M., via Facebook [...]
39. From Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë:
“Love not in spite of, but BECAUSE of flaws (which applies both to loving yourself and others).”
Suggested by Samantha P., via Facebook (Jarry Lee)
A London Review of Books columnist says that,
I’ve always longed to be behind those deep red velvet curtains where Jane Eyre sits on the window seat, leafing through Bewick’s History of British Birds. (Jenny Diski)
BBC's  Ariel celebrates BBC Films' 25th birthday and recalls that.
Moira Buffini also did an incredible job with Jane Eyre. She was a playwright who hadn't done an enormous amount at that time, but the structural approach she took to Charlotte Brontë's novel got that script to the attention of several of the biggest players in the business. She's now one of the most sought after screenwriters working in the UK. (Claire Barrett)
The Millions discusses fanfiction in the classroom.
To some extent, fanfiction has always had a place in the English classroom. The history of literature is one of reworking and retelling stories, especially prior to our modern conception of authorship. Popular media narratives often portray fan fiction — using someone else’s books, TV shows, films, or real-life personas, among other things, as the starting point for original fiction — as cringe-worthy scenes of sentimentality and/or sex between superheroes or vampires or all five members of a certain floppy-haired boy band. I and plenty of others have worked to ground the historically marginalized practice in “literary” precedent — favorite examples of authors explicitly refashioning others’ works include Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, both of which I first studied in a classroom.
covercoverBut fanfiction as we conceive of it today isn’t quite the same as Rhys tilting the focus of Jane Eyre to the “madwoman in the attic.” Modern fanfic practices are communal, with roots in mid-20th century sci-fi magazines. They’ve grown up through paper zines and collating parties to message boards and digital archives, and LiveJournal, Archive of Our Own (AO3) and Tumblr and Wattpad. (Elizabeth Minkel)


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