Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Tuesday, April 15, 2014 7:53 am by Cristina in , , , , , , , , , ,    No comments
Nina Camp mentions in The Huffington Post the first time she read Villette.
And speaking of profound vulnerabilities, did you ever read the Charlotte Brontë novel, Villete (sic)? I read it back when I had an attention span. I was even in the middle of a break-up when I read it. He was 14 years older than me, but in great shape. Financial guy. Naturally athletic. Vital. But we all have stories where we miss the boat and then wait on the shore forever for another boat. [...]
But: Villete (sic,again). I remember sitting on the rug in the vestibule of my apartment reading it. I know where I sat because I remember returning to that spot after I'd gotten off the phone with my then-boyfriend after our third breakup. He'd said, "I love you. And I miss you," and I listened and felt nothing and said, "Ok," and then went back to the vestibule to read.
There's a passage near the beginning. A little girl is sitting on her father's lap. Maybe he's just a father figure. But she's sitting with him, being busy and alert and content. I feel like, if my memory is good, that something disruptive was about to happen to her, but in that moment she was, Brontë wrote, "in a trance of content." He'd given her a little kiss. She'd asked, and he gave it. 
Also, The Huffington Post's daily meditation
features a poem by 19th century English author Charlotte Brontë. The poem inspires us to let hope and courage guide us through the "clouds of gloom" that occasionally arise in life. (Antonia Blumberg)
The poem is Life.

The East End Review reviews the Rosemary Branch's performances of Wuthering Heights in London:
The sense of time winding onwards, and the intricate interweaving of the family’s fates, seemingly inevitably, often catastrophically, is complemented by the cast changes – George Haynes and James Hayward play up to four characters each, whilst Helen Watkinson doubles up as Isabella Linton and young Cathy.
A story like Wuthering Heights could easily become claustrophobic in the close confines of theatre, but Tennison’s production keeps us engaged through the haunting play of light and shadow, jangling music and the portrayal of Cathy and Heathcliff’s raging love. (Phoebe Cooke)
The Guardian's A brief survey of the short story features Jean Rhys and mentions Wide Sargasso Sea in passing:
"Too bitter," Jean Rhys said of her work in 1945. "And besides, who wants short stories?" No one did then, at least not hers. Rhys published her first collection in 1927, and her first novel the following year. In the 1930s came three increasingly dark and accomplished novels, but the better she got, the less she was read. She published nothing for 20 years, until stories began appearing in the London Magazine in the early 1960s. In 1966, her final novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, brought her acclaim and a degree of financial security at the age of 76. Another two short-story collections appeared before her death in 1979. They include some of the best British short stories of the last century. (Chris Power)
News Talk has a short article on Caitlin Moran's new novel How to Build a Girl.
It's 1990. Johanna Morrigan, 14, has shamed herself so badly on local TV that she decides that there's no point in being Johanna anymore and reinvents herself as Dolly Wilde - fast-talking, hard-drinking Gothic hero and full-time Lady Sex Adventurer! She will save her poverty stricken Bohemian family by becoming a writer - like Jo in Little Women, or the Brontës - but without the dying young bit. (Caroline Clarke)
The Huddersfield Daily Examiner includes Oakwell Hall on its list of '15 ways to make the most of Huddersfield's sunny weather'.
5) Pack a picnic for Oakwell Hall and Country Park
Popular with Brontë fans and wildlife enthusiasts alike, Oakwell Hall and Country Park is the perfect spot for a summer picnic.
A favourite spot for dog walkers and horseriders, the Birstall park offers woodland walking trails, plenty of green open space and an adventure playground to keep little ones active. And of course the historic hall, made famous as the inspiration for Fieldhead manor house in Charlotte Brontë's Shirley, offers a snapshot of life in the Elizabethan era, surrounded by immaculate gardens.
A tearoom next to the hall serves coffee, cakes and snacks, while two educational visitor centres help youngsters learn more about the wildlife found in the park's woods and ponds. (Samantha Robinson)
Reader, if you would enjoy nothing better than to spend an evening debating feminist themes in Victorian literature, then this is the video (and likely, the comment thread) for you. In this episode of Crash Course, host John Green picks apart Charlotte Brontë’s masterwork, including her personal history, the plot of the novel, and the tip of the interpretive iceberg. Go make some popcorn. (Becky Chambers)
A Group Reading Day organised by the London and the South East Brontë Society branch:
Group Reading Day at the CAA led by Brenda McKay
Mr. Gilfil's Love Story by Geoerge Eliot.
The Brontë Parsonage Facebook page also links to that video, by the way. And as part of their #weatherwatch, they show two gorgeous pictures of sunny Haworth yesterday: one, two


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