Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 9:14 am by Cristina in , , , , , ,    No comments
Yorkshire Life asks Ann Dinsdale, Principal Curator at the Brontë Parsonage Museum, about her favourite things and places in Yorkshire.
Inspiration outdoors. Haworth and the moors. There's some beautiful landscapes from Penistone Hill in Haworth looking over towards Stanbury. It has the little stone farmhouses on the moorland and the sky is ever-changing. [...]
A Yorkshire view that inspires. The Moors in Haworth offer the most inspirational views - that wild moorland landscape continues to inspire me.
MY LIGHT IS SPENT: Museum worker Harry Jelley reads as part of the How My Light Is Spent installation by Frank Cottrell-Boyce at the Bronte Parsonage Museum in Haworth, West Yorkshire, England. The installation explores the memories of the Bronte sisters' father, Patrick, as he recovered from a cataract operation. Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire
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Here's one of The Irish Times' Images of the Day:
How My Light is Spent: Museum worker Harry Jelley reads as part of the How My Light Is Spent installation by Frank Cottrell-Boyce at the Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth, West Yorkshire, England. The installation explores the memories of the Bronte sisters' father, Patrick, as he recovered from a cataract operation. Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire (Laura Hutton)
The Film Stage reviews the film How to Build a Girl by Coky Giedroyc (based on the Caitlin Moran's book)
The result was the first installment of a planned trilogy entitled How to Build a Girl. At its center is young Joanna Morrigan—an over-achieving aspiring poet with pictures of her heroes (Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Taylor, and the Brontës) adorning her wall as vessels with which to bestow wisdom. (Jared Mobarak)
Cheat Sheet recommends period dramas for Harlots fans.
Jane Eyre
This 2006 adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s celebrated novel Jane Eyre stars Luther’s Ruth Wilson as the title character and Toby Stephens as Mr. Rochester. Brontë fans with the Starz add-on will also want to stream the 2011 film version of Jane Eyre, with a screenplay written by Moira Buffini, the co-creator and executive producer of Harlots. (Megan Elliott)
Love Reading has a Q&A with writer Rachel Edwards.
What was your favourite book to read as a child, do you still have that book, and have you read it since? Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. True treasure: I picked it out for myself on my first ever trip to Foyle’s, during what was, I believe, my only solo trip to London with my father. It was bound in classic brown and embossed with gold; I adored the novel and read it more than once, aged 10 or 11. I believe that copy still lies somewhere in my mum’s attic. I must re-read it. (Liz Robinson)
Female First has writer Anna Ellroy share 'Seven things I'd like my readers to know about me' and number six is
Novels that made me the writer I am: Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall has been monumental to me, both because of its subject matter, but also its construction of telling a story through the form of both a letter and a diary.
Daily Monitor (Uganda) features a local teacher.
“As I grew, my reading culture kept improving. Before I knew it, my passion for reading was high. By Primary Four I was reading novels such as Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë and Mother by Maxim Gorky,” [Noeline] Nanyondo says. (Phionah Nassanga)
Chicago Tribune recommends several bookish podcasts. Among them is
Book Cheat'
It may seem out of character for me to recommend a podcast that’s focused on helping you learn more about classic books so you can pretend to have read them, but “Book Cheat” is a fun and enlightening show. Host Dave Warneke has read the book under discussion (for example, “Wuthering Heights”), while his two guests have not. Rather than a dry, solo lecture, we’re treated to a book discussion, albeit a discussion where only one of the discussants has read the actual book. Warneke summarizes the book as best he can, while the guests interrupt with questions and comments. (John Warner)
Inventive DIY tips by this Kansas City Star columnist:
Fortunately, I switched the tone early. Other sills conjure comedians’ hilarious observations, and the rest remind me of Charlotte Brontë. (Shout out to the History Chicks podcast.) Yes, Charlotte and her sisters had some bad luck, but they also lived lives of brilliance. Now when I look out certain windows, I’ll imagine I’m gazing at a sweeping moor instead of a suburban lawn needing a good mowing.
This all sounds crazy, but trust me, before undertaking any home maintenance drudgery, I recommend first tuning into upbeat music/educational stuff. That’s the big takeaway here. Why not absorb positivity while your hardwood floor is absorbing a latex blob that just missed the drop-cloth? (Denise Snodell)
The Eyre Guide posts about Jane Eyre 1961.

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